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SELECTED LISTENING
FILM
&
TV
CHINA'S TERRACOTTA ARMY (BBC TV 2007)
BBC National Orchestra of Wales/Chris Austin
Wars
Pastorale
Tomb
Landscape (Opening titles)
Museum
THE MOST COURAGEOUS RAID OF WWII (BBC TV 2011)
with Paddy Ashdown
Bordeaux Harbour
Claude de Baissac
Tidal Overfall
Hasler's trumpet (end credits)
Escape after raid
TROUBLE IN AMISH PARADISE (BBC TV 2008)
Nick Gethin, cello
Titles
Family
Funeral
Credits
GARDENER PROVOCATEUR (BBC TV 2006)
Emerald Ensemble
Long Border
THE LIST (2006) (BASIC PICTURES USA/Warner Bros)
film clips with electronic score
starring Brad Dourif, Wayne Brady and Sidney Tamiia Poitier
It's good
Thai food (Final scene)
A NEW YEAR AT KEW (2006)(BBC, 3rd series, with Alan Titchmarsh)
Gerard McChrystal, sax
Morning
Evening
Night
CONCERT
WORKS
STRING QUARTET no 4 (2009)
Carducci String Quartet/Presteigne Festival 2009
First movement: Moderato flessibile - Vivace
Second movement: Lento e calmo
Finale: Allegro moderato - Allegro molto
CELLO CONCERTO
Raphael Wallfisch (cello)
BBC National Orchestra of Wales
Grant Llewellyn (conductor)
Extract
RHAPSODY on themes from THE SNOW GOOSE
Original themes by Carl Davis from his score to the 1971 film.
Czech National Symphony Orchestra
Carl Davis (conductor)
Commissioned by Davis in 1995 originally for his 60th birthday CD but now available on 'Carl's War' released in 2010, part of the Carl Davis Collection. In creating this work the themes have been moulded into a symphonic structure for full orchestra.
Complete work
LOVE IS A BABE
text from Sonnet 115 by William Shakespeare, Those Lines That I Before Have Writ Do Lie
Commissioned for the album: Shakespeare - The Sonnets released on April 23rd 2012 by Abbey/Universal and performed purely a capella by six voices of
I Fagiolini dir. Robert Hollingworth
complete song
WINTER CHORALE (2006)
Text from the Kyrie Eleison and Laurie Lee's Winter Landscape
I Fagiolini with the Academy of Ancient Music, dir. Robert Hollingworth
shortened version c.10mins
SILENT NIGHT (2010)
Eight-part motet using the traditional words
BBC Singers dir. Robert Hollingworth
Complete, c.6mins
MIGRATIONS (1998)
Amsterdam Sinfonietta
Very short extract
Whole work
MAELIENYDD (2008)
Presteigne Festival Orchestra/George Vass
Extract
DIES IRAE (1988)
BBC Welsh Symphony Orchestra
Short extract
Whole work
RED KITE FLYING (2004)
Gillian Keith (soprano)/Simon Lepper (piano)
Poem by the composer
Complete song
Cantata: THE WAYS OF GOING (1990)
James Meek (baritone) Sian Davies (oboe) members of The Chamber Music Company/ dir. composer
Text from poems by Alun Lewis
PART 1 only
Prologue - Instrumental prelude - All Day It Has Rained - Oh Journeyman
TE DEUM (1989)
for three antiphonal choirs, chamber organ and trumpet
Combined choirs of Omnes Gentes/Hoite Pruiksma
recorded in Leeuwarden, Holland (poor sound quality)
Extract
JIZO (2002)
three portraits of Japanese childrens' deities
New Art Trio (Belgium)
Jizo Bozatsu
Sendan Kendatsuba
Kariteimo
BIOGRAPHY
Described by Yehudi Menuhin as a "master of intricate patterns and forms" Adrian Williams was born in Hertfordshire and showed precocious talent at the piano as a young child.
He began composing at the age of eleven, his early promise resulting in consultations with Lennox Berkeley followed by composition and piano studies at the Royal College of Music where his teachers included Bernard Stevens, Alan Ridout and John Lill.
During his RCM studies Williams received recognition for his first mature orchestral work, the gritty and ambitious Symphonic Studies, an achievement acknowledged by the RCM director Sir David Willcocks who conducted the work with the RCM orchestra. His final year at the College were marked by two accolades, a Leverhulme scholarship and the coveted Menuhin Prize for Composition.
The years that followed saw a period as Composer in Residence at Charterhouse School during which his music underwent a stylistic reassessment. The outcome was a tougher harmonic language that although more adventurous in its range and scope, retained an underlying melodic vein that has always remained central to his music. Several important works were to emerge from this period including the Second String Quartet, a remarkable uninterrupted span of thirty eight minutes and the intricately orchestrated symphonic poem Tess.
During the eighties a move to the Welsh Borders saw Williams find his spiritual home, along with the peace of mind and creative impetus for many of his most vital works. Amongst them is the piece spawned by his winning the Guinness Prize for Composition, the cantata after Louis MacNeice Not Yet Born, Images of a Mind for cello and piano, the Cantata after Alun Lewis The Ways of Going and Dies Irae, the latter a BBC Welsh Symphony Orchestra commission that in its power of expression, recalls the Sinfonia da Requiem of Britten, a composer that remains one of Williams' most significant influences.
It was during his early years in the Welsh borders that Williams became the founding light of the Presteigne Festival, an enterprising event that continues to thrive and maintains a strong commitment to contemporary music.
The multi-faceted, even eclectic nature of Adrian Williams' music has also seen him forge a successful career in music for film and television, a field he continues to be active in, whilst his absorption of influences as diverse as English song and elements of jazz and minimalism has seen his catalogue of major works grow to demonstrate a richly compelling creative voice.
Ever searching for new creative horizons, Williams' recent scores, including Maelienydd (2008) for Chamber Orchestra and the String Quartet no 4, premiered to acclaim at the 2009 Presteigne Festival, exhibit a deeply felt emotional core, conjuring with the atmosphere and wild, open spaces of the composer's Welsh Borderland surroundings with a renewed sense of wonder and mystery.
The Cello Concerto (2009) marks the culmination of Adrian Williams' long standing relationship with Raphael Wallfisch, an ardent champion of the composer's works for cello who also gave the first performance of his Spring Requiem in 1993.

Christopher Thomas ©